Geno Smith Fires Agent After Draft Descent

Geno Smith, the once projected top NFL draft pick who fell to the second round, fired his agent, citing “a number of things.”The former West Virginia quarterback, who tumbled into the second round (39th overall), confirmed Tuesday in an interview with SiriusXM NFL Radio that he parted ways with Select Sports Group. He claimed it wasn’t because of his big drop in the draft.“I don’t want to shed too much light on it,” he said. “The thing that I can tell you is that it’s not because of the whole draft experience. It’s not because of one particular incident. There are a number of things, and that story, you know, that battle will be fought on a different day. As of right now, I don’t feel too comfortable talking about all the details of it.”By rule, Smith has to wait five days before he can sign with another agent. Sports Business Journal first reported his decision.Smith was projected as a possible top-10 pick, although there was a growing belief in the days before the draft that he could slip.The agonizing wait in the green room at Radio City Music Hall was “hard to stomach,” he said. After Day 1, he announced his plans to leave New York for home, but he changed his mind and returned to the green room.As it turned out, Smith wasn’t the first quarterback taken. E.J. Manual went to the Buffalo Bills with the 16th pick. The Jets passed twice on Smith in the first round before pulling the trigger.Because of the rookie wage scale, there isn’t much room for negotiation. Smith will receive a deal similar to that of last year’s 39th pick, St. Louis Rams cornerback Janoris Jenkins–a four-year deal for $4.99 million.Smith’s former agents, Jeff Nalley and Erik Burkhardt, didn’t return calls for comment.The firing of his agents, coupled with his threat to leave the draft after the first day, has raised questions about Smith’s maturity.“One of his perceived weaknesses was working through adversity,” a personnel executive said Tuesday, speaking on the condition of anonymity. read more

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Two arrested in missing teen case

first_imgVancouver police arrested two people Wednesday for allegedly harboring a runaway teen who was found Tuesday.Lori M. Kingrey, 50, and her 17-year-old son were arrested on suspicion of harboring a runaway, Isabella Castillo, 16, according to a news release from the Vancouver Police Department. Castillo had been missing from her home in central Vancouver for more than two weeks. Based on a tip from a friend, the family feared she was involved in sex-trafficking. She was found by police safe and unharmed Tuesday and is currently staying with family friends.An investigation revealed that Castillo had been staying at Kingrey’s home in the 900 block of West 17th Street, the news release said. The 17-year-boy is supposedly Castillo’s boyfriend. Kingrey was booked into the Clark County Jail and her son was taken to the Clark County Juvenile Detention Center.“We’re having a difficult time that a parent would allow this anguish for 15 days,” said Cymany O’Brien, Castillo’s aunt and guardian. “As a parent, (Kingrey) had a responsibility.”last_img read more

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Childhood trauma may trigger physical pain in adulthood

first_imgDo you want your children to be happy when they grow up? If yes, then you have to make sure that they are not experiencing any kind of trauma as a child. A new study, including an Indian – origin researcher, suggests that childhood trauma or adversity may trigger physical pain in adulthood. The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”The findings suggest that early life trauma is leading to adults having more problems with mood and sleep, which in turn lead to them feeling more pain and feeling like pain is interfering with their day,” said co-author Ambika Mathur from the Pennsylvania State University.But the connection was weaker in those who felt more optimistic and in control of their lives. “The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day,” Mathur added. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe findings build on previous research that suggests a link between adult physical pain and early-in-life trauma or adversity, which can include abuse or neglect, major illness, financial issues, or loss of a parent, among others, the researcher said.For the current study, researchers recruited a diverse group of 265 participants who reported some form of adversity in their early lives. They answered questions about their early childhood or adolescent adversity, current mood, sleep disturbances, optimism, how in control of their lives they feel, and if they recently felt pain. They found that while participants who showed these forms of resilience didn’t have as strong a connection between trouble sleeping and pain interfering with their day, the resilience didn’t affect the intensity of pain.last_img read more

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