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Trump signs spending deal, after threatening veto

first_imgFederal Government | Nation & World | NPR NewsTrump signs spending deal, after threatening vetoMarch 23, 2018 by Domenico Montanaro, Scot Detrow, Scott Horsley, Tamara Keith and Kelsey Snell, NPR Share:President Trump decided to throw a wrench into the process of avoiding a government shutdown with a veto threat against a compromise spending bill that passed Congress.(Photo by Evan Vucci/AP)Updated at 9:39 pm AKTThe Associated Press reports that President Donald Trump signed a $1.3 trillion spending measure Friday averting a government shutdown at midnight, acting just hours after saying he was considering a veto.Updated at 11:05 a.m. EDTPresident Donald Trump threatened to veto a massive spending bill Friday morning, hours before the government could shut down if it doesn’t get the funding it approves.The $1.3 trillion omnibus legislation passed both chambers of Congress after lengthy negotiations between leaders of both parties. The Senate passed it late Thursday and most lawmakers had left Washington by Friday morning.Even so, Trump tweeted just before 9 a.m. EDT that he is “considering a veto” because the bill does not address his immigration priorities.I am considering a VETO of the Omnibus Spending Bill based on the fact that the 800,000 plus DACA recipients have been totally abandoned by the Democrats (not even mentioned in Bill) and the BORDER WALL, which is desperately needed for our National Defense, is not fully funded.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 23, 2018The threat of a veto this late in the game is highly unusual for a president, particularly one whose party controls both chambers of Congress. White House officials had said Trump would sign it. Trump’s allies on Capitol Hill said the president supported it.“Oh yes,” House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., told reporters this week. “Oh yeah. Yeah. Yeah, the president supports this bill — there’s no two ways about it.”It’s unclear what spurred the president’s tweet on Friday, but he’s a noted Fox & Friends viewer. On the show Friday morning, one contributor called it a “swamp budget” because is it does not support a border wall.The White House had been looped in throughout congressional leaders’ spending negotiations, and Friday morning Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway also told Fox News that the president planned to sign the bill.A day before, Vice President Pence told an audience in New Hampshire that one reason Trump would sign the omnibus was because it included support for a border wall.“And with $1.6 billion included in the spending bill that arrives on President Trump’s desk tomorrow, we’re going to start to build that wall,” Pence said to applause. “We’re doing it.”White House budget boss Mick Mulvaney also cited increases in spending for national defense, combating opioid addiction, school safety, workforce development and funding for infrastructure.He noted that it does a lot of what the administration wants on immigration.“So all things considered,” Mulvaney said, “when we look at the bill, we have to weigh what we asked for and what we had to give away to it. Is it perfect? No. Is it exactly what we asked for in the budget? No. Were we ever going to get that? No. That’s not how the process works.”Mulvaney did address the immigration issues that Trump highlighted on Friday morning as one reason he might not ultimately sign the omnibus.They include the dispute over the policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which shields immigrants in the U.S. illegally who were brought to the country as children.“Did we get everything that we wanted when it comes to immigration? Absolutely not,” Mulvaney said. “Did we get a DACA fix? No. And let’s make it clear. The president wanted a DACA fix as part of this deal. He had offered a large package with a complete DACA fix in exchange for the entire wall. ”Trump and Republicans offered Democrats three years’ worth of a DACA “fix” in exchange for three years’ worth of support for a Mexico border wall, Mulvaney said.There is more to the story, though: In exchange for a DACA fix, Trump demanded changes to legal immigration in addition to wall funding.Trump has rejected proposed bipartisan DACA fixes that would swap a permanent fix for money to build a border wall. The White House demanded broader changes to legal immigration that Democrats wouldn’t support.Music to ears of the hawks Trump’s veto threat on Friday was welcome news to fiscal hawks who had railed against the bill’s spending increases.Please do, Mr. President. I am just down the street and will bring you a pen. The spending levels without any offsets are grotesque, throwing all of our children under the bus. Totally irresponsible. https://t.co/np7BmP1AkB— Senator Bob Corker (@SenBobCorker) March 23, 2018Conservatives opposed the bill because it would add to the deficit. Many, like House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows, R-N.C., say they were dismayed that the legislation includes spending increases sought by Democrats and fails to fulfill Republican campaign promises to cut the overall size of government.The @freedomcaucus would fully support you in this move, Mr. President. Let’s pass a short term CR while you negotiate a better deal for the forgotten men and women of America. https://t.co/Dj05V8hevl— Mark Meadows (@RepMarkMeadows) March 23, 2018Republican leaders could have crafted a spending bill that met conservative demands, but it would fail in the Senate, where Democrats have enough votes to block legislation.The omnibus spending package has been in the works for several months and was crafted with input from both the White House and Congress. It was written to fill out a budget outline that Congress passed, and Trump signed, in February.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Thursday the spending legislation was a true compromise.“Months of in-depth, bicameral, bipartisan negotiations and committee work have led up to this point,” McConnell said. “The result is legislation that neither side sees as perfect — but which contains a host of significant victories and important achievements on behalf of the American people.”Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.Share this story:last_img read more


Afilias IPO: Irish web domain company takes the plunge with new listing

first_imgTuesday 21 October 2014 8:47 pm Afilias, the Dublin-based internet service provider, yesterday defied the stock market gloom to launch a $100m (£62m) listing.The flotation, which is being led by mid-market broker Numis, will see the company list on Aim, the junior stock market next month.The company has the second largest number of domain names in the world and will place the shares with institutional and professional investors to raise a warchest to fund future growth.“The placing will bring significant benefits – by providing further capital to fund our organic and acquisitive growth plans, and raising our corporate profile with existing and new customers,” executive chairman Jonathan Robinson said.The business has grown revenues from $61.7m in 2011 up to $77.6m in 2013, and now has adjusted earnings margins of 49.6 per cent.“Since 2001, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading players in the domain name industry,” chief executive Hal Lubsen said.“The increasing use of the internet is here to stay, and underpins the growth in our market.”Numis is also set to act as its nominated adviser on the alternative investment market. whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailThe No Cost Solar ProgramGet Paid To Install Solar + Tesla Battery For No Cost At Install and Save Thousands.The No Cost Solar ProgramRaid Shadow LegendsDon’t play this game if you are under 40 years oldRaid Shadow LegendsHero Wars This game will keep you up all night! Hero Wars All Things Auto | Search AdsMost Affordable Camper VansAll Things Auto | Search Adszenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekElite HeraldKate Middleton Dropped An Unexpected Baby BombshellElite HeraldLoan Insurance WealthSanjay Gupta’s Wife Might Look Familiar To YouLoan Insurance Wealth Tags: IPOs More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org Show Comments ▼center_img Michael Bow Bow Share whatsapp Afilias IPO: Irish web domain company takes the plunge with new listing last_img read more


Will Trump’s new plan to cap insulin costs in Medicare actually save seniors much money? It’s complicated

first_img WASHINGTON — The Trump administration claims its newest plan to cap insulin copays could solve seniors’ woes with the high cost of insulin. But the reality is more complicated.The plan, which was released Wednesday, would allow certain private Medicare plans to cap how much seniors can spend for insulin at $35 a month. It’s a politically popular policy being rolled out just as high insulin costs are dominating the conversation over high health care costs more generally. Tags diabetesdrug pricingMedicareSTAT+White House Washington Correspondent Nicholas Florko reports on the the intersection of politics and health policy. He is the author the newsletter “D.C. Diagnosis.” What is it? Politics Nicholas Florko @NicholasFlorko About the Author Reprints By Nicholas Florko March 13, 2020 Reprints What’s included?center_img Will Trump’s new plan to cap insulin costs in Medicare actually save seniors much money? It’s complicated GET STARTED Log In | Learn More Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Adobe [email protected] STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDlast_img read more


Laois heart failure patients urged to embrace free supports

first_imgHome News Community Laois heart failure patients urged to embrace free supports NewsCommunity TAGSIrish Heart Foundation Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months Laois heart failure patients urged to embrace free supports WhatsApp Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Council The Irish Heart Foundation The estimated 1,800 people living with heart failure in Laois are being urged to embrace a wide range of supports to help them manage the chronic condition.The Irish Heart Foundation is at the centre of a national drive to provide vital back-up to patients who need help coping with the illness.The plea for patients to reach out coincides with conclusion of Heart Failure Awareness Week – but, they say, supports are available year round.“People often feel shock, trauma and isolation after a diagnosis of heart failure, but with the right supports, it is manageable,” said Lucinda McNerney, the Irish Heart Foundation’s Heart Failure Programme Manager.“We want to let these patients in Laois know that we are with them on that journey, in terms of counselling, online meetings, a Nurse Support Line, exercise classes, newsletters, a podcast series and peer-to-peer support to help them to keep well, both physically and mentally.“We have patients in our network aged 30 and above, whose daily lives have changed – their work status, having to take medication, dealing with lower energy.“All this can be helped with access to information and support, both from our healthcare professionals and talking to people on a similar path.”Heart failure occurs when the organ stops working as well as it should and finds it more difficult to pump blood around the body efficiently.Consultant Cardiologist at the Mater Hospital and Chair of the Irish Heart Foundation’s Heart Failure Council, Dr Emer Joyce, says it can arise independent of age – with lifestyle factors such as diet, smoking, excess alcohol consumption and lack of exercise fuelling increased prevalence of cases among younger people.“You can live with heart failure and people can actually get it into remission,” she said.“People who are most likely to achieve that are those who not only follow the medications, but follow all the lifestyle factors such as being physically active, keeping a healthy BMI and minimising any potential cardiotoxins.”Mother-of-three Karen MacLaughlin, 57, one of the 90,000 people in Ireland living with heart failure, says every day is a fight since her diagnosis in January last year.“Fear becomes your daily companion; fear of dying, your heart condition worsening, another heart attack. Every day is a fight and our invisible disability is not recognised,” said the former Holles Street midwife from Sallynoggin, Dublin.“The charity’s Facebook group, ‘Heart Support Network’ gives me the opportunity to see the stories of other people who face similar challenges and enables me to feel less alone and isolated.”If you are a heart failure patient and would like to join the Irish Heart Foundation’s Network and access support, you can sign up at irishheart.ie.SEE ALSO –Sadness as ‘founding member, former player and chairman’ of Laois GAA club passes away Facebook Pinterest Electric Picnic Facebook Electric Picnic By Alan Hartnett – 18th May 2021 Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleSadness as ‘founding member, former player and chairman’ of Laois GAA club passes awayNext articleNumber of parking tickets handed out in Laois during Covid-19 pandemic revealed Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Twitter Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival last_img read more


Bhavik Nagda: Delving into deployment of new technologies

first_imgBhavik Nagda: Delving into deployment of new technologies Massachusetts Institute of Technology “We need more technologists in the room while policies are formulated,” says the MIT senior. As a senior majoring in computer science, Bhavik Nagda had always been fascinated by futuristic technologies, such as robots and space exploration rovers. But what led impossible sounding ideas to become real products? Nagda sought to find out by attending MIT’s Science Policy Bootcamp. Photo: Gretchen Ertl In the future, Nagda hopes to return to D.C. and leverage his technical background. He views the area as similar to MIT – a place where ideas flow and can have wide-scale impact. His experience also showed him the greater need for engineers on Capitol Hill. Photo: Gretchen Ertl “Academia,” “government,” “industry” – Bhavik Nagda squinted closely as his professor pointed to each word on the diagram of the American economy’s core components. Between each word sprouted dozens of arrows, illustrating the complex interactions between the three institutions.“There were just so many arrows,” says Nagda, recalling the presentation during MIT’s Science Policy Bootcamp. “I was blown away. It gave a voice to the way I think about systemic issues and how America has built its economy.”A senior majoring in computer science, Nagda had always been fascinated by futuristic technologies. Upon coming to MIT he quickly took on research roles in everything from artificial intelligence to computational cognitive science. But he found himself coming back to a key question: What led impossible-sounding ideas to become real products?The pieces finally connected when he attended the bootcamp, taught by Bill Bonvillian, the former director of the MIT Washington Office, during the Institute’s Independent Activities Period (IAP) in January. Nagda had already observed the importance of cooperation between innovators and policymakers during several internships, in roles as an engineer and a technology investor. The bootcamp crystallized his understanding of how critical this cooperation is to the U.S. economy – and he began to envision a future for himself working at the intersection of technology, innovation, and policy.A key concept from the course, explains Nagda, was the “valley of death,” which describes the difficulty a research idea often faces in receiving enough funding to continue with development. He learned how programs such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which helped launch major inventions such as GPS and the internet, are crucial drivers for the economy.Nagda agreed – he had seen firsthand how few ideas make it past this valley and reach commercialization. For the past few months, he had been working at Bessemer Venture Partners. The firm is famous for its cloud investments, such as Pinterest, Twilio, and Twitch. Nagda worked as a technology investor to find and recommend emerging companies.The experience showed him that while the venture community funds a variety of ideas, scalable “software-as-a-service” (SAAS) products and biotech products have remained the most lucrative for the last decade. He became fascinated with ways governments can use their expansive resources to support early-stage research in fields like clean energy and precision medicine.But in addition to funding new ideas, governments must also anticipate the pitfalls of technology and create policies to protect the public, says Nagda. He witnessed collaborations between politicians and innovators during an earlier sophomore-year internship, working as a software engineer at Cruise Automation, a company that has been introducing self-driving cars into cities that can be hailed via phone app.Prior to the company’s launch, many policymakers were worried about public safety. A single flaw in a vehicle’s design could lead to severe danger for both passengers and pedestrians, a prospect the engineers took very seriously.For example, “One of the challenges is making an accurate sensor,” says Nagda. “The lidar and stereo camera imagery and inertial measurements must help the computer estimate the location and speed of the vehicle. It’s very challenging.” As an intern, he noted with interest how Cruise’s engineers worked with policymakers to ensure the technology would meet predetermined safety conditions.He also witnessed the company develop coalitions across San Francisco. Employees from the government and community relations teams spoke with community members of all backgrounds, from biking commuters to homeless people. The goal was to interpret the concerns of everyday people about autonomous vehicles and consider their thoughts into the car’s design.This focus on societal impact by tech companies has grown due to the recent national scrutiny of industry leaders, such as Amazon, Apple, Google, and Facebook. “The congressional hearings have shown us there’s a lot of work Silicon Valley has to do. There’s now a focus for tech companies to think about their stakeholders as opposed to just directly maximizing share value,” he says.Nagda’s interests in technology and government were also fueled by a summer he spent working for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), with support from MIT’s PKG Center. He helped to research robotic telemarketing, or “robocalling.”“When robocalling was first invented, it was very exciting to people. But in the last decade, we’ve started to get around three to four calls a day,” says Nagda. “There are so many innocent people who get hacked into revealing their bank numbers.”Nagda’s team focused on helping to authenticate callers who had been incorrectly blocked and labeled as robocallers. Their response code helped to recognize this error and provide users a message to automatically reverse the mistake. The work was presented to the Internet Engineering Task Force.After meeting policymakers in person, Nagda was surprised to see a level of government cooperation rarely portrayed in the media. “It was amazing to see delegates from both sides of the aisle work together on this issue.”During his time at MIT, Nagda has also conducted research in the labs of Professor Tomas Lozano-Perez of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and as a research assistant for economics Professor Jonathan Gruber. Since last year, he has worked in the lab of brain and cognitive sciences Professor Joshua Tenenbaum, through the SuperUROP program; his research has included work on an artificial intelligence system that can “learn” to play Atari video games.He also taught an engineering bootcamp in Soroti, Uganda for students ages 12-19 during IAP this past year through MIT’s D-Lab Development program. And, he has participated in the MIT Driverless Team, which builds cars and races them in international competitions.In the future, Nagda hopes to return to Washington and leverage his technical background. He views the area as similar to MIT – a place where ideas flow and can have wide-scale impact. His experience also showed him the greater need for engineers on Capitol Hill.“For the last decade, it’s been clear that technology is impacting society in often detrimental ways. It’s a front and center issue in politics right now. I think to push the needle forward, we need more technologists in the room while policies are formulated.”In terms of whether he plans to be involved in research, policy, or business, Nagda is still unsure. “I don’t know where I’ll be, but I know I’ll be thinking about these three issues for the rest of my life.” /University Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:artificial intelligence, Capitol Hill, clean energy, Commission, communications, Engineering, exploration, Federal, Government, GPS, intelligence, MIT, San Francisco, Self-driving, self-driving car, silicon valley, universitylast_img read more


Man sentenced for defrauding Commonwealth payments

first_imgMan sentenced for defrauding Commonwealth payments Department of Human ServicesThis is a joint media release between the Australian Federal Police and Services Australia.A 33-year-old Sydney man has been sentenced to three years imprisonment for multiple fraud offences following allegations he redirected Commonwealth government payments to accounts controlled by him.With assistance from Services Australia, officers from the Australian Federal Police (AFP) Taskforce Iris arrested the man on Thursday 24 September 2020 at his Mays Hill home in Sydney, NSW.During the search warrant, investigators from the Taskforce seized a number of electronic items and files containing personal identification details of victims.The AFP alleged the man improperly accessed Centrelink records to change the payment destination of a customer’s payment into a bank account he controlled.The 33-year-old also attempted to access the Centrelink records of several other customers and contacted Services Australia while impersonating other customers in order to gain access to their accounts and alter payment destinations.Investigators calculated the fraud value to be more than $18,000.The 33-year-old man was sentenced before the Parramatta Local Court on 19 March 2021 to three years and one day of imprisonment, with a non-parole period of two years.The AFP’s Taskforce Iris is dedicated to targeting people and organised crime entities who plan to defraud the Governments COVID-19 support measures.Anyone with information about suspected fraud of Government benefits can make a report via the “Reporting Fraud” page on the Services Australia website at www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/fraud, or by calling the Australian Government Services Fraud Tip-off Line on 13 15 24. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AFP, Australia, Australian, Australian federal police, Australian Government, commonwealth, covid-19, crime, Federal, Government, Human Services, NSW, Parramatta, police, Sydney, warrant, websitelast_img read more


What can UN do to support India through its deadly COVID-19 surge?

first_imgWhat can UN do to support India through its deadly COVID-19 surge? The United NationsThe UN is at the forefront of efforts to help India extricate itself from the almost unimaginable scale of suffering its citizens are undergoing, as a result of a devastating wave of COVID-19 infections. Earlier this week, UN News spoke to the country chiefs based in India, for the World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN Children’s Fund, to get their take on the crisis. Here are some key excerpts from the interviews.‘We gave the virus a chance’Dr. Roderico H. Ofrin, WHO representative to India: It is important to remember that, by early February of this year, the economy and social activities reopened. We also saw that people were not behaving in a way that was appropriate to slowing COVID-19, and I think that’s why we are where we are. There are many reasons, but basically, we gave the virus a chance to keep transmitting.Dr. Yasmin Ali Haque, UNICEF representative to India: In 2020 we were working closely with the Indian Government on spreading health messaging and preventing infections. Life began getting back to normal this year, and this is when the second wave hit. COVID-19 vaccine vials are stored in a government-run facility in New Delhi, India.An overwhelming waveDr. Ofrin: The way the virus has spread is similar to what we’ve seen in Europe or the US, but the scale is very different. The density of the population is probably also a factor, and we’ve seen that the spikes are acute in metropolitan areas. In the weeks when the cases were rising, the system was able to absorb patients, and extra beds were also being made available last year. So, it’s a scale issue: the scale of the surge and the scale of the response.This virus is adapting so fast, that no model has been able to predict how it will spread. We have to be ahead of the game: it’s a cycle of preparedness, readiness, response and recovery. You can’t stop. /UN News Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:children, covid-19, crisis, Economy, Europe, Government, health, India, New Delhi, U.S., UN, UNICEF, vaccine, WHO, world, World Health Organizationlast_img read more


Handling Harassment Cases Among CU-Boulder Students Presents Unique Challenges

first_imgAs CU-Boulder’s Office of Discrimination and Harassment initiates the process of training faculty and staff to identify, and prevent, workplace discrimination and harassment, the Office of Judicial Affairs will focus on cases involving students, and will face some issues unique to students in the process. Jamal Ward, director of the Office of Judicial Affairs, said discrimination and harassment cases involving students are typically more likely to involve harassment than discrimination, particularly in racially motivated incidents. But unlike incidents in the workplace, the harassers in student cases often are anonymous and, therefore, cannot be held accountable. “The Office of Discrimination and Harassment probably would see more cases of discrimination than we will,” Ward said. “On the student side, harassment is the behavior that we’re more likely to see, and a problem for our investigator is the fact that harassment or bias-motivated incidents involving students usually involve an anonymous perpetrator. “We’ve all heard of bias-motivated cases on campus, but in almost every one of those cases no one knows who the perpetrators are, which makes it very difficult for us to process cases,” he said. “In most of these cases, we have a complainant but no respondent, or perpetrator.” Even if the perpetrator is known, the cases are difficult to review, said Ward. “It becomes complicated for several reasons. One is that we have to take into account the First Amendment right to free speech and we have to scrutinize the behavior to determine the kinds of behavior that rise to the level of a policy violation,” he explained. Out of five bias-motivated cases that were reported in the media last spring, only one was brought to the Office of Judicial Affairs for review of ethnic intimidation under the Code of Conduct, Ward said. Review of harassment and discrimination cases involves 10 areas of discrimination identified as “protected class,” including race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, creed, religion, sexual orientation and veteran status. Alternative ways of resolving conflicts can include using methods such as mediation, restorative justice and other less traditional programs. Under the Code of Conduct, a student reported for harassment or discrimination in any of the protected class categories is referred to the Judicial Affairs Office, which conducts a review of the allegations and of the police report, when applicable. If an investigation is not warranted, alternative resolution methods can be used. If an investigation is required, the parties meet with the investigator, who then decides whether charges are brought forth. If a student is found to have violated the Code of Conduct, he or she could be sanctioned in a variety of ways. Depending on the seriousness of the violations, sanctions may range from being assigned to write a paper about the incident, giving a talk, attending a presentation and performing community service to more stringent sanctions including probation, suspension in abeyance, suspension and expulsion. “We try to make certain that the facts of the situation warrant the sanction that we impose and that the sanctions educate the student at the same time,” Ward said. “We want the students to be able to extract some educational principles from the process and to learn as much as possible through the variety of sanctions that we employ.” Numerous bias-motivated incidents were reported in campus residence halls last year, including incidents involving race or ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and others. Most of the incidents were verbal or written, including graffiti, and they targeted both individuals and groups. While the new policy is implemented across campus, students are receiving more guidance on behavioral expectations through freshman orientation and other programs in an effort to prevent bias-motivated incidents from happening in the first place, Ward said. For more information about the Judicial Affairs process go to the Web site at www.colorado.edu/studentaffairs/judicialaffairs/index.html. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 19, 2005 last_img read more


Temporary closure slated for Euclid Avenue

first_img Published: May 24, 2018 Euclid Avenue from just east of the Euclid Parking Garage entrance to 18th Street will be closed May 29 to July 12 as construction crews install a raised crosswalk and perform utilities work. Sidewalks along both sides of the street will also be closed.The Euclid Parking Garage will remain open during the construction. Work will be adjacent to 18th Street, but the street will remain open. Some paving activities will occur at the intersection of 18th Street and Euclid Avenue. This work will reduce 18th Street to one lane at times, with flaggers directing traffic for those activities. The Euclid Avenue closure, coupled with the fact that there is no left turn from southbound Broadway onto 18th Street, means that parking permit holders for lots 204, 310 and 325 who would normally approach campus from the north on Broadway are encouraged to instead take Folsom Street or 28th Street to Colorado Avenue, then proceed through campus on Regent Drive, turn right on Broadway, and approach 18th Street from the south. Categories:Deadlines & AnnouncementsCampus Community Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more


Bogle Vineyards, the Sacramento Kings & Doug Christie Team Up to…

first_imgHome Industry News Releases Bogle Vineyards, the Sacramento Kings & Doug Christie Team Up to Help…Industry News ReleasesWine BusinessBogle Vineyards, the Sacramento Kings & Doug Christie Team Up to Help Raise Funds for Six Regional CharitiesBy Press Release – March 8, 2018 67 0 TAGSBogle VineyardsSacramento Kings Twitter Email Facebook Pinterest Linkedin Share Previous articleAveine, the First Smart Wine Aerator, Available Soon on IndiegogoNext articleJean-Charles Boisset, Proprietor of Boisset Collection, and Kapil Sekhri, Co-Founder of Fratelli Wines, Partner to Present J’NOON — A Unique Global Collaboration Press Release ReddIt AdvertisementFans have a chance to bid on and win tickets to the wine-pairing dinnerClarksburg, CA – Bogle Vineyards will host the first-ever Swish and Swirl wine-pairing dinner featuring Sacramento Kings legend Doug Christie on May 5 to raise funds for six charities making an impact in the greater Sacramento community.Guests who attend will be able to enjoy high-quality wines, locally sourced food and dine with Christie and members of the Bogle family at the winery in Clarksburg.Habitat for Humanity, Positive Coaching Alliance – Sacramento, Rotary Club of Roseville, Sacramento Food Bank, Sacramento SPCA and Shriner’s Hospital for Children, will each auction off 8 tickets to the dinner. 100% of the money raised through the ticket auctions will go directly back to the charities.“It’s going to be a great night supporting some awesome charities,” Doug Christie, Sacramento Kings Legend and Kings broadcaster. “There’s nothing better than good wine with friends.”The Swish and Swirl wine-pairing dinner will be held on Bogle Vineyards’ tasting room lawn during the evening of Saturday, May 5. In addition to meeting Christie and the Bogle family, guests will be treated to an intimate tasting guided by Bogle’s award-winning winemakers while they dine in the midst of the chardonnay vines.“These charities are doing phenomenal work in the Sacramento region and we want to be able to help ensure they can continue to make a positive impact in our communities for years to come,” said Warren Bogle, President of Bogle Vineyards. “We are grateful for the opportunity to host this wonderful event at our family’s winery and are looking forward to a fantastic evening.”No general admission tickets to the Swish and Swirl dinner will be sold, however, fans can bid on tickets through one of the six charities’ auctions or by participating in the Swish and Swirl social media contest. Each charity will auction off their tickets during various events and online auctions. Fans are encouraged to contact the specific charity they wish to support if they are interested in bidding on tickets.Throughout the Sacramento Kings 2017-2018 regular season, fans can enter a chance to win tickets by posting to their social media accounts using #SwishandSwirl. The seven winners will each be allowed to bring a guest to the dinner. Details on submissions are below. How to enter the Swish and Swirl contest: Snap a photo with your favorite Bogle wine and Sacramento Kings gear.Post it to Instagram, Twitter or Facebook using the hashtag #SwishandSwirlSeven winners will be chosen at the end of the Kings 2017-2018 regular season.Must be 21 years of age or older to enter. Contest Details: http://www.boglewinery.com/swishswirl/About Bogle Vineyards:The Bogle family has been farming in the Delta since the late-1800s, but the first wine grapes did not appear until 100 years later. The father and son team of Warren and Chris Bogle planted the first 20 acres of vines in Clarksburg, California in 1968. Today, Bogle Vineyards farms 1,600 acres of grapes in the Delta region using the latest sustainable growing techniques and processes. Bogle is one just a handful of wineries that pays its partner growers a per ton bonus for adhering to stringent voluntary sustainable practices and regulations. The success of Bogle over the years is firmly rooted in one thing: the day-to-day involvement of the Bogle family.  This is the 6th generation of the Bogle family working in the Delta and with hard work and respect for the land, the Bogle family hopes to ensure another six more generations are able to farm along the Sacramento River. http://www.boglewinery.com/Advertisement last_img read more